The dentist

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The dentist

Postby rigger » 08 Nov 2017, 17:06

I've got a new dentist.
He's German and his name is Arnie.

I didn't know I had a new dentist till I went for a six-monthly checkup, only to find my usual one had left.
She was called Rosemary and was funny and flirty - we're the same age - and we'd usually spend more time chatting than getting any dental work done. I never had any work done by her in approximately ten years of seeing her.

So, out with the old ..

The new guy is nothing short of amazing.
In my first visit for that checkup, he had a go at me for brushing too hard before going on to explain that only a little pressure was needed - "about 50gms, do you have a kitchen scale ?" - and that I should be holding the toothbrush with the tips of my fingers. I was wearing the gumline down and could lose my teeth in another ten to fifteen years if I continued.
He actually made me gently squeeze his finger several times during the consultation to drive home his point about how to hold the damn brush but it worked - I understood what he meant, followed his advice at home and now my teeth feel just as clean but a lot less sensitive. I've also been telling people about it, wondering why I learnt more from him in ten minutes than I ever did from British dentists in 40+ years.

Today, I went to see him again for the first of three procedures : a small, triple filling along the gumline of my upper right; a larger filling, lower left and a "scaling" clean. This afternoon was the triple.

I walked in at half three for a 15:35 appointment and "shook" his finger rather than his hand, using approx. 50gms of pressure :D

He laughed heartily before getting down to business.
He injected me three times with anaesthetic and inside TWO MINUTES asked "Ready ?"
It was my turn to laugh and I asked why I didn't need to go outside and wait fifteen minutes like every other time I'd had a filling.
He explained that this was standard anaesthetic nowadays although it wasn't widely used in the UK till recently, despite being freely available in Germany since 1971 (how German is that, knowing the precise year ?)

I love this guy.
He's funny, he's direct and he's a bloody good dentist.

He quickly completed the triple filling before smoothing it all with one of those whirlygig thingies and then asked me to check his work with my tongue, so it was "smooth and natural" before he applied a protective varnish.
He then said I could eat immediately if I wanted, but the numbness would take a couple of hours to wear off.

He only charged me for one filling because he did them all together too, which was very agreeable.

Seriously, I think we've been living in the dark ages over here.
There's a Belgian working in the same practise too, so I could improve both my French and my German at this rate.

The entire visit took fifteen minutes.
I'll be back in three weeks for the other stuff he needs to do, but I was so impressed with his (stereotypical) speed and efficiency :thumbup:
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Re: The dentist

Postby Davycc » 08 Nov 2017, 19:13

Her indoors knocks my teeth out for free !!

Seriously though, having had a P*ss poor dentist and eventually finding a good one I can appreciate what you're saying " Wots wrong with yer teeth technique " as they say at Audi
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Re: The dentist

Postby johnh » 08 Nov 2017, 19:30

I can't stand that pink liquid they give you to drink. I spit it down that little sink when they turn their back.:D
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Re: The dentist

Postby Davycc » 08 Nov 2017, 19:33

johnh wrote:I can't stand that pink liquid they give you to drink. I spit it down that little sink when they turn their back.:D


You use the sink !!
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Re: The dentist

Postby Frankie » 08 Nov 2017, 21:01

I don't mind the dentist, I am lucky enough to have very good teeth!

I do however have a similar hatred of going to the hairdressers! So many of them just completely ignore what you say and you end up having to grow out the mistakes that you had just grown out from the previous visit!

More often than not I have cut my own hair. Recently for the first time in my life I have grown it longer, but again I dared to go to the hairdressers, but she cut some bits at the front that I had spent the last year growning out. The worst thing was that I could see her doing it and didn't say anything! I sat watching saying to myself 'that's wrong, tell her to stop' but I just sat there like a numpty. I won't be going back to that one either now. :crazy:
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Re: The dentist

Postby Frankie » 08 Nov 2017, 21:02

rigger wrote:I've got a new dentist.
He's German and his name is Arnie.

I didn't know I had a new dentist till I went for a six-monthly checkup, only to find my usual one had left.
She was called Rosemary and was funny and flirty - we're the same age - and we'd usually spend more time chatting than getting any dental work done. I never had any work done by her in approximately ten years of seeing her.

So, out with the old ..

The new guy is nothing short of amazing.
In my first visit for that checkup, he had a go at me for brushing too hard before going on to explain that only a little pressure was needed - "about 50gms, do you have a kitchen scale ?" - and that I should be holding the toothbrush with the tips of my fingers. I was wearing the gumline down and could lose my teeth in another ten to fifteen years if I continued.
He actually made me gently squeeze his finger several times during the consultation to drive home his point about how to hold the damn brush but it worked - I understood what he meant, followed his advice at home and now my teeth feel just as clean but a lot less sensitive. I've also been telling people about it, wondering why I learnt more from him in ten minutes than I ever did from British dentists in 40+ years.

Today, I went to see him again for the first of three procedures : a small, triple filling along the gumline of my upper right; a larger filling, lower left and a "scaling" clean. This afternoon was the triple.

I walked in at half three for a 15:35 appointment and "shook" his finger rather than his hand, using approx. 50gms of pressure :D

He laughed heartily before getting down to business.
He injected me three times with anaesthetic and inside TWO MINUTES asked "Ready ?"
It was my turn to laugh and I asked why I didn't need to go outside and wait fifteen minutes like every other time I'd had a filling.
He explained that this was standard anaesthetic nowadays although it wasn't widely used in the UK till recently, despite being freely available in Germany since 1971 (how German is that, knowing the precise year ?)

I love this guy.
He's funny, he's direct and he's a bloody good dentist.

He quickly completed the triple filling before smoothing it all with one of those whirlygig thingies and then asked me to check his work with my tongue, so it was "smooth and natural" before he applied a protective varnish.
He then said I could eat immediately if I wanted, but the numbness would take a couple of hours to wear off.

He only charged me for one filling because he did them all together too, which was very agreeable.

Seriously, I think we've been living in the dark ages over here.
There's a Belgian working in the same practise too, so I could improve both my French and my German at this rate.

The entire visit took fifteen minutes.
I'll be back in three weeks for the other stuff he needs to do, but I was so impressed with his (stereotypical) speed and efficiency :thumbup:



I have an electric toothbrush that flashes a red light if you use too much pressure! :thumbup:
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Re: The dentist

Postby Davycc » 08 Nov 2017, 21:04

Frankie wrote:I don't mind the dentist, I am lucky enough to have very good teeth!

I do however have a similar hatred of going to the hairdressers! So many of them just completely ignore what you say and you end up having to grow out the mistakes that you had just grown out from the previous visit!

More often than not I have cut my own hair. Recently for the first time in my life I have grown it longer, but again I dared to go to the hairdressers, but she cut some bits at the front that I had spent the last year growning out. The worst thing was that I could see her doing it and didn't say anything! I sat watching saying to myself 'that's wrong, tell her to stop' but I just sat there like a numpty. I won't be going back to that one either now. :crazy:


I love my hairdresser, he's the best
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Re: The dentist

Postby rigger » 09 Nov 2017, 03:10

Davycc wrote:
I love my hairdresser, he's the best


Mine's better :shh:
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Re: The dentist

Postby Barlow Boy » 09 Nov 2017, 10:48

I hate the dentist, not helped by the fact I have a fear of needles (think it’s called tryphanaphobia or something).

I’ve had two teeth out, and a number of fillings without anaesthetic, originally the dentist wouldn’t do the work and I had to get a note from my doctor. Must admit though, and I was telling DLW this previously, my eyes did water a bit when I had to have a screw inserted into my gum and did think to myself I might have to have the needle next time.
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Re: The dentist

Postby rigger » 09 Nov 2017, 10:50

Barlow Boy wrote:I hate the dentist, not helped by the fact I have a fear of needles (think it’s called tryphanaphobia or something).

I’ve had two teeth out, and a number of fillings without anaesthetic, originally the dentist wouldn’t do the work and I had to get a note from my doctor. Must admit though, and I was telling DLW this previously, my eyes did water a bit when I had to have a screw inserted into my gum and did think to myself I might have to have the needle next time.


My god !
Are you mad :o

I don't know how you can put up with that level of pain .. but if you need to get something done, why not go somewhere they still use gas ?
I think France still allows it, so it could be worth a trip as a health tourist.

My mate had his done in Hungary, but that was more to do with the price of an entire new set than a fear of needles.
If you thought that post was good, you should check out my interesting and constantly surprising blog: http://paulridgeblog.com/
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