Etymology- The history of the English language

Engage in some light-hearted challenges to test your knowledge and wits

Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 10 Aug 2020, 05:50

How is your etymology or history of words in English? Does anyone even think about where our words came from? There are approximately 161,000 words currently in use for the English language some we use for daily English and some we use for specialized subjects such as medical terminology, scientific terminology and other specialized subjects.

Many words of the English language are not originally English at all and over the past 1000 years English has derived from the four corners of the globe from the British Empire conquests and subsequent governing of conquered countries from local tribes in India to more commonly adapted words from the French language which in itself derived from Latin.

There are currently approximately 7,000 -10,000 words that derive from French in the English language, but there are 99 commonly used words we use on a daily basis

how many do you know? Here are the first 21 words that start with A, B, or C letters of the alphabet. (i'm bored) haha. I will add more letters in a few days time just to give everyone a chance to do it. This is the first time trying something like this so be gentle on me if I screwed it up or its not appropriate or even boring.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12. Brunette: mid 16th century: from French, feminine of brunet, diminutive of brun ‘brown’. SelbyWhite :thumbup:
13.
14. Cafe: early 19th century: from French café ‘coffee or coffee house’. SelbyWhite :thumbup:
15.
16.Champagne: Strange one this as it's original form is from Italy but more commonly recognised as a French word. Davycc :thumbup:
17.
18.Chic: mid 19th century: from French, probably from German Schick ‘skill’. SelbyWhite :thumbup:
19.
20.
21.
Last edited by CorkWhite on 12 Aug 2020, 00:50, edited 4 times in total.
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Selby White » 10 Aug 2020, 07:03

Accuse
Acquaintence
Abbey?
Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you.
User avatar
Selby White
LUFCTALK Moderator
 
Posts: 12285
Joined: 25 Mar 2012, 11:32

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Davycc » 10 Aug 2020, 07:48

Apartment
crepe
All at Amazon Books

The Funny Corner
When Santa Got Stuck Up The Chimney
The Thrones Murders
User avatar
Davycc
LUFCTALK Moderator
 
Posts: 11722
Joined: 03 Aug 2011, 18:09
Location: Under a thumb

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Selby White » 10 Aug 2020, 08:18

Cafe
Chic
Blonde
Brunette ?
Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you.
User avatar
Selby White
LUFCTALK Moderator
 
Posts: 12285
Joined: 25 Mar 2012, 11:32

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 10 Aug 2020, 11:04

Davycc wrote:Apartment
crepe

Good words but apartment is originally from Italian and Crepe is originally a Latin word which then went to old French then to modern day French. :thumbup:
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 10 Aug 2020, 11:12

Selby White wrote:Accuse
Acquaintence
Abbey?


Accuse is an old Latin word therefore not originally French
Acquaintance is indeed an old French word and should be on the list of 21 words but wasn't. Abbey is a medieval Latin word originally and then was incorporated into the French word Abbeie but again not on the list

Cafe is indeed French originally :thumbup:
Chic is a German word originally, as schick mid 19th century: from French, probably from German Schick ‘skill’. it is on the list though :thumbup:
blonde is a Germanic word
Brunette is indeed another French word which was spelled as Brun first and later as brunet :thumbup:
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby mapperleywhite » 10 Aug 2020, 13:13

Here's a few I can think of for now:

Almond - from the Spanish 'almendra'
Avenue and aubergine - same in French
Bazaar and cashew - are words of Indian origin
Beer - from German 'bier'
Broccoli - identical in Italian
Chocolate - is 'chocolat' in French
Coffee - from French/Spanish 'cafe'
Courgette and creche - identical in French

In the past I've also understood that words ending in '-ation'' arrived with the Normans in 1066 eg administration
Might have to take an interest in the Premier League now....
User avatar
mapperleywhite
Raich Carter's Contract Agent
 
Posts: 3173
Joined: 28 Apr 2012, 14:02

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 10 Aug 2020, 22:37

mapperleywhite wrote:Here's a few I can think of for now:

Almond - from the Spanish 'almendra'
Avenue and aubergine - same in French
Bazaar and cashew - are words of Indian origin
Beer - from German 'bier'
Broccoli - identical in Italian
Chocolate - is 'chocolat' in French
Coffee - from French/Spanish 'cafe'
Courgette and creche - identical in French

In the past I've also understood that words ending in '-ation'' arrived with the Normans in 1066 eg administration

Almond = Middle English: from Old French alemande, from medieval Latin amandula, from Greek amugdalē not on the list of 99
Avenue = originally a Latin word as Advenire then later as Avenir in French and 17th Century as Avenue in English
Aubergine = late 18th century: from French, from Catalan alberginia, from Arabic al-bāḏinjān (based on Persian bādingān, from Sanskrit vātiṃgaṇa ).
bazaar = late 16th century: from Italian bazarro, from Turkish, from Persian bāzār ‘market’.
cashew = late 16th century: from Portuguese, from Tupi acajú, cajú .
beer = Old English bēor, of West Germanic origin, based on monastic Latin biber ‘a drink’, from Latin bibere ‘to drink’; related to Dutch bier and German Bier .
Broccoli = is indeed of Italian origin = mid 17th century: from Italian, plural of broccolo ‘cabbage sprout, head’, diminutive of brocco ‘shoot’, based on Latin brocchus, broccus ‘projecting’.
chocolate = early 17th century (in the sense ‘a drink made with chocolate’): from French chocolat or Spanish chocolate, from Nahuatl chocolatl ‘food made from cacao seeds’, influenced by unrelated cacaua-atl ‘drink made from cacao’.
coffee = late 16th century: from Turkish kahveh, from Arabic qahwa, probably via Dutch koffie
Courgette = 1930s: from French, diminutive of courge ‘gourd’, from Latin cucurbita
creche = "Christmas manger scene," 1792, from French crèche, from Old French cresche"crib, manger, stall" (13c.), ultimately from Frankish or some other Germanic source; compare Old High German kripja, Old English cribb (see crib (n.)). Also "a public nursery for infants where they are cared for while their mothers are at work" (1854).

I would have thought the last two would have made the list as well as avenue but sadly they aren't. some nice words though MW. :thumbup:
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby BrighouseWhite » 11 Aug 2020, 05:03

The only word I can come up with off the top of my head is chef
There's light at the end of the tunnel and the future's looking very bright indeed.
User avatar
BrighouseWhite
Major Frank Buckley's monkey gland expert
 
Posts: 696
Joined: 23 Jun 2011, 19:59

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 11 Aug 2020, 11:15

BrighouseWhite wrote:The only word I can come up with off the top of my head is chef

Chef is 100% a French word, CH at the start of the word is a hint and how it's pronounced. It wasn't on the list I had originally had but Excellent nonetheless BW :thumbup:

There are three ways to pronounce the letter combination “ch” in English. The SH sounding words are originally from French. The other two sounds are Germanic (church, brochure and witch etc) and Greek origins (chasm, school and Mechanic)
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Next

Return to Quizzes & games

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests