Etymology- The history of the English language

Engage in some light-hearted challenges to test your knowledge and wits

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Davycc » 11 Aug 2020, 11:41

In that case Champagne
All at Amazon Books

The Funny Corner
When Santa Got Stuck Up The Chimney
The Thrones Murders
User avatar
Davycc
LUFCTALK Moderator
 
Posts: 11713
Joined: 03 Aug 2011, 18:09
Location: Under a thumb

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Selby White » 11 Aug 2020, 11:47

Davycc wrote:In that case Champagne


And Chute
Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you.
User avatar
Selby White
LUFCTALK Moderator
 
Posts: 12261
Joined: 25 Mar 2012, 11:32

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Sniffer » 11 Aug 2020, 17:31

Selby White wrote:
Davycc wrote:In that case Champagne


And Chute


Chute: French for fall - hence parachute.
Sniffer
Arthur Fairclough's milliner
 
Posts: 2247
Joined: 17 Feb 2013, 17:03

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Sniffer » 11 Aug 2020, 17:31

Bungalow - Indian.
Sniffer
Arthur Fairclough's milliner
 
Posts: 2247
Joined: 17 Feb 2013, 17:03

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 12 Aug 2020, 00:43

Davycc wrote:In that case Champagne

correct Davy :thumbup:
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 12 Aug 2020, 00:52

Sniffer wrote:
Selby White wrote:
Davycc wrote:In that case Champagne


And Chute


Chute: French for fall - hence parachute.

early 19th century (originally a North American usage): from French, ‘fall’ (of water or rocks), from Old French cheoite, feminine past participle of cheoir ‘to fall’, from Latin cadere ; influenced by shoot.
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 12 Aug 2020, 00:55

Sniffer wrote:Bungalow - Indian.

:D Sniffer we're on A, B, and C words and French words at the moment mainly due to the big influence of French on the English language. But yes bungalow is an Indian word and there are a few more from the Indian languages we have incorporated in our language
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby Sniffer » 12 Aug 2020, 05:57

CorkWhite wrote:
Sniffer wrote:Bungalow - Indian.

:D Sniffer we're on A, B, and C words and French words at the moment mainly due to the big influence of French on the English language. But yes bungalow is an Indian word and there are a few more from the Indian languages we have incorporated in our language


Sorry. Dyslexic. Didn't see the French bit (or didn't make the connection).
On a tangent, there are several rivers down here in Somerset called the Yeo. Apparently this comes from the French word for water, eau. I have this mental image of a Norman knight riding around Somerset pointing at a stretch of water and demanding "What is that called?" and obliging peasants replying "That's the eau, sir".
Sniffer
Arthur Fairclough's milliner
 
Posts: 2247
Joined: 17 Feb 2013, 17:03

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 13 Aug 2020, 11:28

Here are the remaining words from the French A, B and C words from the French connection to the English language, some will surprise you


1. Allowance – from the Old French word alouance (payment)
2. Apostrophe – from the French word apostrophe
3. Attaché – from the French word attaché (attached)
4. Apéritif – from the French word apéritif
5. Avant-garde – from the French word avant-garde
6. Aviation – from the French word aviation
7. Bachelor – from the Anglo-Norman word bacheler (bachelier in modern French)
8. Baguette – from the French word baguette (stick)
9. Ballet – from the French word ballet
10. Beret – from the French word béret
11. Bon voyage – from the French phrase bon voyage (have a good journey)
12. Brunette: mid 16th century: from French, feminine of brunet, diminutive of brun ‘brown’. SelbyWhite :thumbup:
13. Bureau – from the French word bureau (desk, office)
14. Cafe: early 19th century: from French café ‘coffee or coffee house’. SelbyWhite :thumbup:
15. Cabaret – from the French word cabaret
16. Champagne: Strange one this as it's original form is from Italy but more commonly recognised as a French word. Davycc :thumbup:
17. Cliché – from the French word cliché
18. Chic: mid 19th century: from French, probably from German Schick ‘skill’. SelbyWhite :thumbup:
19. Connoisseur – from the French word connoisseur
20. Cul-de-sac – from the French word cul-de-sac (bottom of the bag/sack)
21. Cadet – from the French word cadet
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

Re: Etymology- The history of the English language

Postby CorkWhite » 13 Aug 2020, 11:31

Now comes the French words that start with D, E, F and G of which there are twenty on this list. Have a try, I will put the words up again in 3-4 days time.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
11.
12.
13.
14. Faux-pas – from the French word faux pas - Mapperly White :thumbup:
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Last edited by CorkWhite on 15 Aug 2020, 05:34, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
CorkWhite
Neil Redfearn's diversity coach
 
Posts: 84
Joined: 11 Jul 2020, 08:45

PreviousNext

Return to Quizzes & games

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests