Living wage at ER

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Living wage at ER

Postby Leonickroberts » 09 Aug 2019, 09:33

Anyone happen to know whether all LUFC employees are paid the living wage? Given the horrific situations at Bury, Bolton and Coventry, where bankruptcy has led to many non-playing staff relying on foodbanks to eat, there's increasingly a debate on how football clubs treat those working beyond the team and management. Was wondering how those working in catering, stewarding etc are treated/paid.
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Re: Living wage at ER

Postby Davycc » 09 Aug 2019, 09:37

Article on BBC this morning.

Premier League clubs have been urged to pay all staff above the minimum wage after spending £1.41bn on players.

Many cleaners, security guards, caterers and other staff do not earn enough money to cover the cost of living, the charity Citizens UK said.

It said only four out of 20 Premier League clubs are accredited by the Living Wage Foundation.

The clubs who have not signed up have been accused of losing touch with "the lives and struggles of workers".

Late signings take spending to £1.41bn
'Real living wage' rises to £9 an hour
Chelsea make living wage commitment
Luton make living wage commitment
Companies accredited by the Living Wage Foundation commit to paying all staff and any third-party contract workers the voluntary rate of £9 an hour and £10.55 in London, higher than the statutory UK National Minimum Wage of £8.21.

Everton, Liverpool, Chelsea and West Ham have all made the pledge - while some football clubs outside the top league, such as Championship side Luton, also pay the voluntary rate.

'Not right'
"I struggle to put food on the table for my family and I often have to have cut-price meals," said a cleaner who works at Manchester United's Old Trafford stadium.

"Considering the amount of money in football, it would be great to see the club paying all their staff a fair and decent wage," he said.

Premier League clubs made a record combined revenue of £4.8bn in the 2017-18 season.

By the end of transfer deadline day on Thursday the top clubs in English football had spent £1.41bn in a summer of signing new players - just short of the £1.43bn record set in 2017.

Citizens UK said a new football season was starting with employees "left on the breadline" which was "not right when clubs are splashing out record fees on players".
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Re: Living wage at ER

Postby Leonickroberts » 09 Aug 2019, 09:42

Davycc wrote:Article on BBC this morning.

Premier League clubs have been urged to pay all staff above the minimum wage after spending £1.41bn on players.

Many cleaners, security guards, caterers and other staff do not earn enough money to cover the cost of living, the charity Citizens UK said.

It said only four out of 20 Premier League clubs are accredited by the Living Wage Foundation.

The clubs who have not signed up have been accused of losing touch with "the lives and struggles of workers".

Late signings take spending to £1.41bn
'Real living wage' rises to £9 an hour
Chelsea make living wage commitment
Luton make living wage commitment
Companies accredited by the Living Wage Foundation commit to paying all staff and any third-party contract workers the voluntary rate of £9 an hour and £10.55 in London, higher than the statutory UK National Minimum Wage of £8.21.

Everton, Liverpool, Chelsea and West Ham have all made the pledge - while some football clubs outside the top league, such as Championship side Luton, also pay the voluntary rate.

'Not right'
"I struggle to put food on the table for my family and I often have to have cut-price meals," said a cleaner who works at Manchester United's Old Trafford stadium.

"Considering the amount of money in football, it would be great to see the club paying all their staff a fair and decent wage," he said.

Premier League clubs made a record combined revenue of £4.8bn in the 2017-18 season.

By the end of transfer deadline day on Thursday the top clubs in English football had spent £1.41bn in a summer of signing new players - just short of the £1.43bn record set in 2017.

Citizens UK said a new football season was starting with employees "left on the breadline" which was "not right when clubs are splashing out record fees on players".


Hadn't actually seen this, but perfect timing! It's something I feel pretty strongly about - football clubs need to look after the communities they rely on and give something more back than just the occasional first-teamer visit to a hospital ward. The living wage exists for a reason, would be great to know if Leeds pay it.
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Re: Living wage at ER

Postby Another Northern Soul » 09 Aug 2019, 10:36

Leonickroberts wrote:Anyone happen to know whether all LUFC employees are paid the living wage? Given the horrific situations at Bury, Bolton and Coventry, where bankruptcy has led to many non-playing staff relying on foodbanks to eat, there's increasingly a debate on how football clubs treat those working beyond the team and management. Was wondering how those working in catering, stewarding etc are treated/paid.


I don't really want to get immersed in the issue so here's just some views not to be taken too seriously if you disagree - firstly, the vast majority of people in catering, stewarding and match day 'hospitality' for want of a better word, aren't full or even part-time employed. There are casual-terms people on the ground staff too, there always was.

My Dad was on the groundstaff full time for nearly 30 years from around 1970 and the pay, even when the club was in ascendancy, was very poor and almost certainly not a legal minimum. And it was bloomin' harder work in them days too, I assure you! But those were the times when people employed at ER were proud to be so and there were plenty of plus points being employed by LU. IIRC Leeds City Council took over the club in the early 80s (this def needs checking if you're interested enough) but the point is, LCC naturally have to pay respectable wages to all staff, so my Dad suddenly got a decent pay rise plus benefits of a union and more stringent working conditions.
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